East Coast Rocker

Putting You in the Front Row

Mondo NYC Fest To Be Held Oct. 4-8, Puts Out Call for Musical Performers and Panelists – Apply Here

Fall NYC Festival Seeking Performers

By JOHN DALY

The second Annual Mondo.NYC festival and global business summit of music and tech industry returns to New York City Oct. 4-8, 2017.

Mondo connects fans and creators in a shared mission of empowering artists and advancing ideas in an ever-changing music business.

Mondo NYC is a creative gathering of tech, music and business innovators - Photo courtesy Mondo NYC

Mondo NYC is a creative gathering of tech, music and business innovators – Photo courtesy Mondo NYC

The 2016 debuted three-day business summit and five-night music festival featured more than 160 bands, 1900 conference delegates and more than 220 speakers.

Artists wishing to be considered for showcase performances should apply HERE.

Mondo’s daytime business summit is held in partnership with New York University. Bringing fans, bands, professionals, entrepreneurs, innovators, brands, media and students together in New York City, Mondo.NYC is an opportunity to be at the heart of music, media and technology.

Industry professionals gather at Mondo.NYC to collaborate, educate, discuss, learn and connect through a series of dynamic panel discussions, seminars and keynotes featuring local and global leaders, practitioners and commentators.

Mondo.NYC 2017 from Mondo.NYC on Vimeo.

At night, Mondo.NYC curates and presents a compelling line-up of national and international artists — from the new and emerging to those on the precipice of global success, playing in the music capital of the world, New York City.

Mondo.NYC is proud to partner with quintessential New York City music venue Rockwood Music Hall. Rockwood will be Mondo’s home base for nighttime events and artist showcases.

For more information, check out the Mondo.NYC website.

 

Innovator Hartley Peavey Receives 2015 Lifetime Achievement Honors at the Annual UK AV Awards

peavey1 Hartley Peavey, founder and CEO of Peavey Electronics, was honored as the recipient of the 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award at the annual AV Awards ceremony in London.

Recognized for his pioneering efforts and 50 years of successful innovation and manufacturing, Peavey appeared in person to accept the award before a crowd of 950 cheering AV industry professionals in the Great Hall of the Grosvenor House Hotel.

“It’s hard to realize that I have been in this industry for over 50 years now,” Peavey said. “We have always tried to bring new and fresh approaches to the areas of technology in which we operate.”

Peavey cited that in the mid-1970s, the company revolutionized the manufacture of guitars with the introduction of CNC Machinery for the first time. Later in the early 1990s the company introduced the first Digital Audio networking and control system, MediaMatrix, which revolutionized the way professional sound is distributed and controlled.

The company has earned more than 180 patents and Peavey said his hope is that the people at his company continue to “make a difference.”

The award is presented by AV Magazine.

peavey2In addition to his product innovations, Peavey pioneered new methods of manufacturing that are now in use throughout the audio/visual industry. Beyond his realm of technology innovation, Peavey has focused on providing reliable and affordable sound reinforcement products to all of the world’s markets, expanding the entire market and exporting to 133 countries worldwide.

Peavey, known for his outspoken viewpoints, is a longtime figure in the world of music. A graduate of Mississippi State, Peavey found his calling in helping to create music sound. As a teenager, he built his first guitar amplifier in the basement of his parents’ house. In 1964, he moved into the first Peavey Electronics facility in the attic space above a music shop in Meridian.

Over the last 30 years, Hartley has expanded his musical empire into the production of keyboards and drum instruments. The company expanded into drums, percussion and most recently, autotune technologies.

 

Mavis Staples Takes Us There; Legendary Singer Awarded Guthrie Prize

Mavis Staples - Photo © 2015 Donna Balancia

Mavis Staples – Photo © 2015 Donna Balancia

By DONNA BALANCIA — Mavis Staples was awarded the Woody Guthrie Prize at the GRAMMY Museum in downtown Los Angeles Wednesday night.

Among those on hand for the prestigious event were Bob Santelli GRAMMY Museum executive director, and Deana McCloud, executive director of the Woody Guthrie Center in Tulsa, Okla.

“Music can be a great tool for social justice,” McCloud said. “We want to change lives and change the world. In this country our history isn’t necessarily pretty but we’re looking for ways to do better.”

Megan Ochs, the daughter of Phil Ochs, accepted the Woody Guthrie Legacy Award on behalf of her father.

“As  patriot it’s not only the right but the responsibility to challenge the government,” Ochs said. “My father found a way to interpret political times through music.”

Staples said she was honored to receive the Woody Guthrie Prize, particularly since The Staples Singers — comprised of patriarch Roebuck “Pops” Staples, Cleotha, Mavis and Pervis Staples — always loved Guthrie’s songs.

Megan Ochs - Photo © 2015 Donna Balancia

Megan Ochs, daughter of Phil Ochs, accepts Woody Guthrie Legacy Award on behalf of her late father at GRAMMY Museum – Photo © 2015 Donna Balancia

“I was a teenager when I heard Peter, Paul and Mary sing “This Land Is Your Land,” and we loved the song so much that we recorded it.”

The lively leader of The Staples Singers, Mavis gave an audience of GRAMMY members and guests insights into her inspiration to sing and record freedom songs.

The Staples Singers had a history of gospel, but it was during the time of the preachings of Dr. Martin Luther King that they found their calling.

She said until the Staples Singers came along, gospel had not previously been blended with blues and it was something that made her family unique — even though their sound was met with a degree of resistance.

Staples said some things have improved, compared to the day and age in which she was raised.  She said her father was 18 and her mother was 16 when they married and that her father was proud of her mother’s cooking.

“My father would invite people over for dinner,” she said. “Ray Charles, Nancy Wilson… Ray tried my mother’s Sweet Potato Pie and said, ‘We should franchise,’” she recalled. “We could make big ones, little ones,’” she recalled. ”  My father would bring sweet potato pie to the disc jockeys,” she said. “They would say, The Staples Singers don’t need payola, they have ‘Pie-ola.”‘

Read more at California Rocker

Rock Stars and Guitars: The East Coast Rocker Interview with Stevie Salas

The Stevie Salas signature Idolmaker is a lot like the artist himself, purposeful with quality, and just a little flashy.

The Stevie Salas signature Idolmaker is a lot like the artist himself, purposeful with quality, and just a little flashy.

 

The Idolmaker, Stevie Salas signature by Framus Warwick —  

By DONNA BALANCIA – Stevie Salas has worked with the best.  But despite being selected to play lead guitar for Mick Jagger, George Clinton and a host of other famous superstars, Salas is true to his humble Southern California roots.

“This is my third signature model in 25 years,” Salas told East Coast Rocker.  Salas’ extensive work as musical director for 19 Entertainment and American Idol inspired the name of the guitar.

“People have told me they think it’s the most beautifully crafted guitar and that’s not because they were talking to me and it’s my signature guitar.  It is extremely good quality. I wanted something different, something that wasn’t a ripoff of a Stratocaster or a Les Paul.”

Sleek in its purple and black with gold tone, the Idolmaker, like the rock star himself, purposeful with quality, and just a little bit flashy. The neckwood is maple, the fretboard is Tigerstripe Ebony with Indian Feather Inlay, a reminder of Salas’ Native American heritage.  It is a carved body top, the bodywood is 1-inch AAA Quilted Maple top with Mahogany body.

Particularly interesting to Salas is Warwick’s devotion to the planet: The company is known to purchase its wood from sustainable sources.

“A few years ago,  I met Hans-Peter Wilfer, who owns Warwick,” Salas said. “I like his views.  Since I have a Native American background, I wanted something that was environmentally friendly.”

Salas said he took a tour around the production facilities in Germany, met the head of production, designer Marcus Spangler and was impressed with what he saw.

“I wanted the precision of German craftsmanship but also the Native American warmth,” Salas said.

Check out Stevie’s Guitar 

CLICK HERE FOR SALAS at FRAMUS NAMMSHOW

— By DONNA BALANCIA

 

UK’s Seatwave to Acquire Ticket App Timbre

UK's Seatwave to acquire TimbreThe UK’s Seatwave, a platform for secondary ticket purchases – is buying Timbre, a Boston-based startup and mobile app that enables users to search for live music and then buy tickets to attend shows.

Techcrunch reported the news today, which came in the form of an official company announcement.

Seatwave said the acquisition will take the company further into the primary ticket market and music discovery and the U.S. market.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Read More Here

Tom DiCillo and The Black and Blue Orkestre Build Bridges with New Album

Tom DiCillo Black and Blue Orkestre East Coast Rocker Interview

—Tom DiCillo: Music plays a leading role in all his work — All photos courtesy of Tom DiCillo

With Bandmates Will Crewdson and Grog Rox, Trio Collaborates on Trans-Atlantic Recording

NEW YORK CITY — It’s been a few years since we’ve spoken to Tom DiCillo, writer and director of such films as Johnny Suede, Living in Oblivion, and the compelling 2009 documentary about The Doors, When You’re Strange. But paths always cross again and we sat down for a Q and A with the director, an East Coast Rocker in his own right.

Fresh off the release of his unique album Hurt Me Tender, recorded with his band The Black and Blue Orkestre, DiCillo shares his opinion on music, film, and on life, as told by one of the few truly independent filmmakers and artists around.  This is Part One of a three-part series.

Hurt Me Tender  is a complex and reflective collection of songs DiCillo  created with his band mates Grog Rox and Will Crewdson. The threesome is known as The Black & Blue Orkestre.

DiCillo sat down to talk with ECR Editor Donna Balancia.

ECR: Tom, I’m extremely happy to catch up with you. In reviewing your work, it’s obvious that you love and respect music. You’ve written and directed films about aspiring musicians, accomplished musicians, and you’ve even collaborated with established musicians.  Now you have an album of your own. How have your Hollywood experiences influenced your music, in particular the Black and Blue Orkestre’s album Hurt Me Tender?

TD: I’ve actually had very few Hollywood experiences. But I do know this;  Hollywood is about power and the perception of power. People telling you what to do, and when you can do it. So, picking up the guitar every now and then is a salvation. It’s a direct connection to something creative.  And you can do it whenever you want to.

Black and Blue Orkestre Tom DiCillo Donna Balancia

Trans-Atlantic Trio: Will Crewdson, Grog Rox, Tom DiCillo

ECR: The Black and Blue Orkestre is a really unique ensemble — and the assembly of the music when all three partners in the band don’t live anywhere near each other is extremely compelling.  How did this happen?

TD: Hurt Me Tender came out of a 5-year collaboration that started with me and UK guitarist Will Crewdson. We connected when my film Delirious was opening in the UK and Will sent me an email saying how much he liked the film. He mentioned his musical tastes and somehow that prompted me to send him the first song I’d ever really sung, my version of “16 Tons.” Will liked my voice and laid down some amazing guitar tracks.

This began our electronic trans-Atlantic collaboration. Eventually I sent him some songs that I had written and again Will added greatly to them with his guitar. Up until that time all the bass and drums were programmed by me. It was Will’s idea to bring in Grog, bass player and lead vocalist for her own group Die So Fluid. I would sketch out a mix with my vocal, Will’s guitar and a basic drum track and send it to Grog in LA. She composed and recorded a bass track and sent it back. Soon, this was how we were doing all our songs.

Will Crewdson was inspired by the films of Tom DiCillo - East Coast Rocker Interview

Will Crewdson

Finally, we had about 12 originals and I just said ‘Let’s see if we can at least get them out there as some sort of album.’ I didn’t have the time to try and get a label interested. But, I thought that all that work should at least be gathered together as some kind of finished product. So, the whole effort became finishing the songs we’d been working on for five years and making them sound like they’d all come from the same musical moment of inspiration. And finally, at the end of 2013, we got them all mastered and released them via Ditto Music.

As of this date we have never performed live together in the same room, city, country or continent.

Frozen Sunset Video by Tom DiCillo and Black and Blue Orkestre

Grog Rox in Frozen Sunset Video

ECR: I love “Shoe Shine Shuffle,” “Frozen Heartache,” “Whiskey Promise” and of course, “Hurt Me Tender.” There is such a sense of longing and adventure at the same time. Can you describe the storylines behind each of these great songs?  What inspired each of them?

TD: There is a vein of something personal in each of the songs. I find I can’t write music (or a film) that doesn’t have some deeper connection for me. All the songs originated out of some simple musical idea. With “Shoe Shine Shuffle” it was a guitar lick that the lyrics, “There’s a word for it,” attached themselves to. As the song developed it took on the idea that all of us have at times prostituted ourselves. It is the way of the world. Some of us do it by choice, most of us are forced into it by circumstance. But, to judge someone for this is idiotic–almost as idiotic as thinking that only “bad” people do this. In some form or another, everybody’s done it. It is especially true in the film business.

Shoe Shine Shuffle BBO East Coast Rocker

Shoe Shine Shuffle by the Black and Blue Orkestre

TD: Great songs are like really good short films to me; the music conveys something that brings both visual and emotional layers. I like words and phrases that also create a distinct emotional world. “Frozen Heartache” is about a woman who is obsessed with a man who could care less about her and she keeps telling another guy all about her torment. She’s so consumed by her obsession she never sees that this other guy is in love with her. I’ve been there. It was Grog’s idea to add her voice on the chorus, “Everybody knows” and I think it adds a spooky, kind of gothic 50’s touch.

Frozen Heartache Black and Blue Orkestre

Frozen Heartache by Black and Blue Orkestre on Soundcloud

“Hurt Me Tender” is the last song I wrote for the album. It started as a kind of latin/gypsy chord progression; something Elvis may have done in the early 60’s, like “It’s Now Or Never.” The title is actually a reference to Elvis, but bent slightly into the psychological realm approaching the masochistic. It’s about a guy who is drawn to a woman whose joy and beauty cover a fear of the world that renders her helpless–and at times exceedingly cruel. I’ve found this combination to be a powerful aphrodisiac for people, especially men.

TD: Your words “longing and adventure” about these songs are very interesting. They imply a certain say, sadness or melancholy at the same time some kind of unexpected drama. I think that’s a good description of what we tried to do with the album. The songs are about people that have come up against some of the shoves and collisions in life. And like all of us, they have the bruises to show for it. That’s one of the reasons the group is called The Black & Blue Orkestre.

ECR: You are attracted to the music of Link Wray, who has a credit on your first film, Johnny Suede.  Is Link Wray a big influence for the BBO?

TD: Yes. I’ve always been impressed by what he brought to the amplified guitar. I like anybody who is genuinely trying something. And somehow, you can always feel it when it’s real.

 

END TOM DiCILLO #BlackandBlueOrkestre PART ONE

Fender Names Bob Roback President, Opens New LA Office

California Rocker Bob Roback

New Fender president Bob Roback will open LA Office

LOS ANGELES — Bob Roback has been named President of Fender Musical Instruments Corp. and will open a new Los Angeles-based office for the company.

Mainly known as co-founder of Dashbox and former Head of Music for Yahoo!, Roback has been an entrepreneur and executive in the music business since 1991.

Read More at California Rocker

@califrocker #Fender #guitars @ecoastrocker

Hartley Peavey to Retailers: Get Passionate

‘Know your product, service the customer, improve the sales experience’

Hartley Peavey, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Peavey Electronic Corp. said sales expertise, customer service and product knowledge are critical to survival of the music retailer today.

How should retailers proceed going into the future? Should the music retailers lobby congress?

“If you’re waiting for the government to come to the rescue forget it,” Peavey advised.  “It’s insane to expect that you’re going to get help from on high. We’ve been spectacularly unsuccessful.”

Hartley Peavey, East Coast Rocker Donna Balancia

Hartley Peavey has an educated opinion. You can ask for it. – photos courtesy of Peavey

Peavey’s stern comments came during a panel discussion at the 2014 NAMM Show.  East Coast Rocker editor Donna Balancia was in the front row.

“I talk to dealers every day, but I want to spend a minute talking about survival for the retail music dealer.

“I went to my first NAMM show in 1954.  I like to ask questions. ‘Mr. Dealer in this value chain what is it that you do? What do you add to the formula? What is your reason for being?’ (He’ll respond) ‘I have trained people,’ which is a lie 98 percent of the time.

“They ignore retailing 101. We’re all consumers. Every day we make decisions where to spend money. When you distill it down, what (the music retailers are) telling you is they’re delivery boys.  The best damn delivery boys are the guys driving those big brown trucks if you compete with them, you will lose.

“So the answers are within you but only if you ask questions. By the way that’s the way you learn stuff, you ask questions. Every one of you retailers . What do you add to the value chain?

“I’m a big believer in education, we started our education program 30 years ago. You go in most retail music dealers they don’t know what the hell they’re selling. How are you going to sell things the customer knows more about than you?

“Your salvation is not with some congressional body, the answer to your future is within you. You’ve got to be willing to rise to the occasion. Music is one of the few things people will fight you over. If you happen to be a country music fan, and the guy sitting next to you is saying bad things about country music you want to give him a knuckle sandwich.

“You’ve got to make the experience of coming into your store a pleasant one.

“One of the things that’s wrong is we want to be everything to everybody. There is no way in hell you can know the features advantages and benefits of more than three or four products.  Are you demo-ing your products that way?

“The internet is not going to go away. It’s here and it’s going to get more pervasive.  Decide now what you’re going to do.

“Selling is not a noun. Retail is not a noun, it’s a verb. The government is not going to save your butt, they’ll kick it if you give them half a chance.

“Education on the retail music sales floor today, it’s at the lowest point ever. If we don’t do something to change that, I don’t know what’s going to happen.

“You’ve got to ask questions.  As a music industry we have done a lousy ass job of promoting ourselves. We’ve gotta ask the important questions to allow us to survive.  You better get back involved in selling with passion. We help people realize their dreams.

“A good salesman helps people realize their goals, objectives and their dreams. We’re in the dream business whether we realize it or not.

“Do things you can’t do by mail. Do installations. Do service. But here he is, in your store. He’s in your store.”

Donna Balancia is editor of East Coast Rocker and California Rocker.  Email her at editor@eastcoastrocker.com

Moog Synthesizer Genome Project Complete

Moog Synthesizer painstakingly recreated East Coast Rocker

The Moog Synthesizer. It no longer shoots rockets.

ASHEVILLE, NC – It has taken three years, but Moog Music engineering team has reverse-engineered and built a 1:1 re-creation of one of the world’s most famous keyboards: Keith Emerson’s Moog Modular, using original processes and components.

Moog Synthesizer

Known as “The Synthesizer Genome Project,” the revitalization of the keyboard was painstakingly undertaken by engineers at Moog Music’s Asheville, N.C. headquarters.

When it was created in 1970, the original Emerson Modular included the following:

·       81 total modules / custom panels

·       12 unique, custom built modules including: sample and hold, preset programmer, custom LFO’s and DRONE VCO Control

·       903 Noise Source and 905 Reverb

·       First synthesizer with performance presets

·       Shoots rockets

The Emerson System, by Moog Custom Engineering, is to be released later this month and is based on the original Emerson Modular. The Emerson System will include the following:

·       Every standard module printed from original circuit board films

·       Original/vintage and new old stock components sourced from around the world

·       All face places are reproduced using original transparencies and techniques

·       Each module is hand build and soldered with original schematics and service manuals as guides

·       No longer shoots rockets

Bob Moog East Coast Rocker

Bob Moog

More information is to come.  The Moog Music 500 series modules and electronic musical instruments are designed and lovingly handcrafted at the Moog factory in downtown Asheville, N.C. Moog Music and its customers carry on the legacy of Dr. Robert Moog, inventor of the Moog synthesizer and Founder of Moog Music Inc.

The company puts on the annual Moogfest in Asheville.  This year the lineup features Kraftwerk 3D and Pet Shop Boys.

For more information, go to Moog Music and Moogfest websites.

END MOOG EAST COAST ROCKER

 

Gibson Government Series: ‘Fight the Powers That Be’

Gibson Guitar Releases ‘Government’ Line of Les Paul Guitars In Response to Raid

Gibson Guitar Corp. has released a “Gibson Government Series” Les Paul guitar made from the tonewood that was seized — and then returned –by the Feds after a raid of the Nashville and Memphis Gibson factories.

The guitar is made from mahogany, maple and the rosewood that was returned by the U.S. Government, and possesses a “high-gloss Government Tan” finish.

“Great Gibson electric guitars have long been a means of fighting the establishment, so when the powers that be confiscated stocks of tonewoods from the Gibson factory in Nashville—only to return them once there was a resolution and the investigation ended—it was an event worth celebrating,” it says on the Gibson Guitar website.

“Introducing the Government Series II Les Paul, a striking new guitar from Gibson USA for 2014 that suitably marks this infamous time in Gibson’s history.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service raided the Nashville-based guitar maker alleging the company violated the Lacey Act, which prohibits the import of certain species of plants.

Gibson settled for $300,000.  The guitar sells for a little more than $1,000. — By Donna Balancia

 

Bob Ezrin: ‘The Future of Music Depends on the Quality of Music’

Ezrin has worked with the heavy hitters of the music world including Alice Cooper, Lou Reed and Peter Gabriel.

Ezrin has worked with the heavy hitters of the music world including Alice Cooper, Lou Reed and Peter Gabriel.

Industry must call music ‘art.’  After all, Ezrin says, ‘A rose by any other name would NOT smell as sweet’ — 

By DONNA BALANCIA – ANAHEIM – Legendary producer Bob Ezrin told music retailers Thursday that the industry must continue to build its talent pool in order to thrive.

Prior to his keynote address to kick off the 2014 National Association of Music Merchants Show in Anaheim, Ezrin told East Coast Rocker that the more time the industry wastes worrying about ancillary issues, the less time it will spend on its most critical function:  To inspire and educate.

“If we spend time worrying about things like how to get the music out, the less time we will have to make insanely good music,” Ezrin told East Coast Rocker prior to delivering his speech at the annual event that draws thousands of industry members from around the world.

His morning keynote speech drew an audience of several hundred music retailers, many of whom forged through rough winter weather to attend the conference in sunny Southern California.

Using cool-sounding words doesn’t cut it for Canadian-born Ezrin, whose experience with “cool” is vast, having worked with hundreds of top musicians since the 1970s.

“When we talk about the future of making music, we have to watch the language we use,” Ezrin said.  “Someone said to me, ‘It’s about the ‘content.‘  No it’s not. ‘Content’ is for cereal boxes, not the art. If it’s called ‘content,’ you diminish the value down to breakfast cereal…When you talk about it with mist in your eyes …Now you’re talking about music.”

Ezrin spends much of his time in philanthropy.  He is co-founder with Garth Richardson and Kevin Williams of Nimbus School of Recording Arts in Vancouver.

Ezrin implores the music industry to use terminology carefully.

Ezrin implores the music industry to use terminology carefully.

Another word Ezrin can’t stand: “Monetization.”

“I don’t want to talk about business models, or the ‘monetization’ of anything, that’s a dirty word.  Unless what we make is great, nobody’s going to pay for it. ”

How will the industry make money?

“The best thing we can be doing is insure a march to excellence, to empower, inspire, to promote people who are straining to do something unique,” Ezrin said. “And to encourage them. Music is the very special creation of very special people whose entire lives and everything they’ve ever done, seen, felt or touched goes into what they do. That process is magical.”

Ezrin said: “There is a certain amount of technique involved. So how do we become insanely great? One of the things to do, whenever you set out on a journey, you need to make a list of things Not to Do, and a list of things To Do.  One of the things to do is to make a ‘Not to do’ list.”

Ezrin warned not to “Get caught up in toys, tricks, technology, packaging, positioning or any of those things before you have something to market,” he said.

Our society is perhaps too caught up in “chasing cool,” or “the latest” in tech and that viral or other song phenomena will happen without that tech factor most of the time, he said. Using the success of the catchy “Who Let The Dogs Out,” as an example, Ezrin said, “I’m sure that person was not sitting at a computer screen or at a conference like this.”

Ezrin, a prolific producer, devotes much of his time now to music philanthropy.

Ezrin devotes much of his time now to music philanthropy. Photo courtesy of Canadian Music Hall of Fame

Ezrin said: “At the end of the day when somebody like Psy comes around, it travels around the world.” He said, the market is “extremely rational. The stuff of real value does get supported and earns something for somebody. And the stuff that’s not so good, typically doesn’t.”

He said formulas don’t count, unless you’re making a widget and what happened before won’t predict the future.

“Art is only something artists can manage,” said Ezrin. “A craftsman is someone who can create and build code .. And an artist is someone who creates something that is different.

He said: “A rose by any other name would not  smell as sweet. If you called roses ‘kumquats’ it would not be the same.”

The music, and not the “content” or the calling it of such, is the key.

“It’s not technology or modality of delivery, it is the special creation of special people that especially touches the hearts of others,” that should be the concern of the industry.

The first line of offense in inspiring youths of today to take up an instrument is to put down the smart phone, Ezrin said.

“Kids, they hear things and kids are incredibly curious, thoughtful about what they see, even with their heads down things get in,” he said. “You need to inspire and educate.  Take them to a concert.  They may be on (the smart phone) but they internalize and maybe they’ll say, ‘I want to do that.”

Todd Rundgren, Luminaries sweep NAMM Awards – with VIDEO

Todd Rundgren performs at TEC Awards @NAMM

Todd Rundgren performs at TEC Awards @NAMM Photo by Jesse Grant/Getty Images for @NAMM

ANAHEIM — Todd Rundgren was presented with the Les Paul Award during an evening that paid tribute to some of the music industry’s finest.

Meyer Sound co-founder John Meyer, and famed session drummer Hal Blaine were inducted into the 29th annual TEC Hall of Fame at the 2014 NAMM.

RUNDGREN PERFORMANCE VIDEO BY CHRIS EPTING – “Hello It’s Me”

“I SAW THE LIGHT” PERFORMANCE AT NAMM VIDEO BY CHRIS EPTING

SEE RUNDGREN VIDEO

Hosted by producer-songwriter BT, the NAMM TEC Awards presentation was an enjoyable night celebrating the achievements of those behind the scenes who make the music industry successful.

Details Click Here

Joan Jett: Social Media Might Have Finished The Runaways

Joan Jett discusses the impact social media has on musicians

Joan Jett discusses the impact social media has on musicians

Joan Jett: Candid about Cyrus, social media:

Read the interview at CaliforniaRocker.com

Google Play Music source code suggests browser uploads coming soon

By NICOLE LEE — ENGAGET–Right now if you want to upload your stash of tunes to Google Play Music, you have to download Music Manager, an application that hooks into your computer’s hard drive so that you can transfer selected audio files to Mountain View’s storage cloud.

But what if you don’t want to download yet another piece of software on your already bursting hard drive, or you just want to upload a few songs from a friend’s computer without having to get the app?

Well, according to an eagle-eyed tipster of the unofficial Google system blog, you might be able to upload songs directly from the browser in the not-too-distant future.

http://www.engadget.com/2013/12/18/google-play-music-upload-browser/