East Coast Rocker

Putting You in the Front Row

Apple Evangelist Guy Kawasaki and The Art of Innovation: ‘Don’t Let the Bozos Grind You Down’

Guy Kawasaki Says Forge Ahead With Good Product

By DONNA BALANCIA

Guy Kawasaki gave his inspiring “Art of Innovation” presentation before a packed house at the NAMM Show Saturday breakfast.

The former Apple marketing “evangelist” had an important message for the crowd of mostly music merchants: Persevere with new ideas no matter what others say.

Stick with your idea, continually develop your idea, but stay away from the clowns, he said during his 10-point presentation.

Kawasaki: No Clowns Here

“There are two kinds of ‘Bozos,'” Kawasaki said. “There is the ‘Loser Bozo,’ the kind with the B.O. and the pocket protector and there is the ‘Winner Bozo’ who wears all black clothing and has a lot of things that end in ‘I’ like Lamborghini.”

The “Loser Bozo” is not a threat.  But be careful of the “Winner Bozo,” the dangerous Bozo, who says no to your idea. You have to separate rich, famous and powerful from those who have been lucky, Kawasaki said.

Kawasaki told the audience it’s important to be “inoculated” against “Bozocity” by being attuned to phrases like “It can’t be done,” and “Why would anyone …?”

Guy Kawasaki said innovators have the bravery to crack a joke - Photo courtesy of Guy Kawasaki

Guy Kawasaki said innovators have the bravery to crack a joke – Photo courtesy of Guy Kawasaki

Generally, those who are afraid of change or the new idea, are threatened for their own job security and will say no.  So go find someone else to pitch and keep going, he said.

Kawasaki says ‘Jump’

Don’t be afraid to “jump the river” and get to the next level of development and continue to think ahead of the curve.  He also said that when you make a presentation, don’t be afraid to crack a joke. He mentioned that on a trip to Russia, he snapped a pic of himself in front of large cannon balls and made a crack about bravery in his presentation.

Other suggestions Kawasaki made include making fans not just at the elusive CEO-level, but start at the ground level, with the people in the trenches because they’ll always be your fans.

Make a niche for yourself. Find the place that the competitors are not, in terms of uniqueness and value. And if you have fans and supporters who may not exactly be in the niche you’re going for, that’s OK too. Don’t turn them away.

And work hard to get that first believer or investor.  It’s good to show people you have at least one solid supporter.  Then you can get the others.

Joe Perry to Receive Les Paul Award at 32nd annual TEC Awards at NAMM Show in Anaheim, Calif.

Photos © SUZANNE ALLISON WITKIN

Aerosmith co-founder Joe Perry will receive the Les Paul Award at the 32nd annual  Technical Excellence and Creativity Awards at this year’s NAMM Show in Anaheim.

The annual award is given on behalf of the Les Paul Foundation and honors individuals that have set the highest standards of excellence in the creative application of recording. Perry will receive the award on Saturday night during the TEC Awards gala at the Hilton.

Perry is set to perform live before an audience of pro audio and sound production inventors, musicians and industry friends.

“Anytime my name is mentioned in the same sentence as Les Paul, it’s a huge honor,” says Perry. “Getting an award bearing his name is the icing on the cake.”

A co-founding member of a Aerosmith, whose music repertoire spans four decades, Perry’s versatile musicianship and influence has helped pave the way for a long list of accolades that reach beyond the band’s more than 150 million albums sold.

Joe Perry, recently wrapped a worldwide tour with The Hollywood Vampires - Photo © Suzanne Allison Witkin

Joe Perry, recently wrapped a worldwide tour with The Hollywood Vampires – Photo © Suzanne Allison Witkin

In the role of principal songwriter, lead guitarist, and as producer for multiple tracks featured on several notable Aerosmith albums, Perry’s talent has helped contribute to the super group’s four GRAMMY Awards,  — one of which includes Perry’s guitar-based instrumental “Boogie Man” —  among many others.  In 2001, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as part of Aerosmith, and in 2013, Perry with his songwriting partner Steven Tyler were recipients of the ASCAP Founders Award and were also inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame.

“Joe Perry was a friend of Les Paul and is undoubtedly one of the most innovative and talented musicians of our time,” said Michael Braunstein, executive director of the Les Paul Foundation. “His ability to push boundaries of the electric guitar with his signature sound and deft playing ability embodies the true spirit of what Les Paul and the award given in his name stands for.

The Les Paul Award has been presented at the NAMM TEC Awards to remarkably-distinguished and accomplished individuals from the music industry, including such luminaries as Sir Paul McCartney, Brian Wilson, Stevie Wonder, Bruce Springsteen, Pete Townsend, Slash and last year’s recipient, Don Was.

For more information go to the TEC Awards Page of the NAMM Foundation.

Don Was To Be Honored with Les Paul Statue During TEC Awards at NAMM Show

Don Was - Photo courtesy CBS

Don Was – Photo courtesy CBS

Record producer and music industry executive Don Was will receive the 2016 Les Paul Award at the 31st annual Technical Excellence and Creativity Awards on Jan. 23 during the 2016 NAMM Show.

The award honors a representative of the music industry who embodies the creative spirit of the legendary genius Les Paul.  The evening will be hosted by Sinbad and will take place at the Anaheim Hilton.

The NAMM Foundation presents the NAMM TEC Awards and the NAMM TECnology Hall of Fame. The events honor the best in audio and sound production as well as the most impactful audio technology products from the last 75 years.

Was is one of the most well-known and accomplished music producers in addition to being an outstanding musician.

Was has earned multiple GRAMMY Awards for his production work over the past 30 years. He produced several of Bonnie Raitt’s albums, including Nick Of Time, which won a GRAMMY in 1989.  He was named Producer Of The Year for work with artists ranging from The Rolling Stones to Willie Nelson and Roy Orbison in 1994, and with  Ziggy Marley on “Family Time,” he earned Best Musical Album For Children in 2009.

He produced, wrote and directed I Just Wasn’t Made for These Times, the 1995 documentary on Brian Wilson, which bowed at Sundance Film Festival; and he also produced the TV movies “Bonnie Raitt: Road Tested,” and “Joe Cocker: Organic.”

Bonnie Raitt and Don Was receive GRAMMY awards for Album of the Year - Photo courtesy CBS

Bonnie Raitt and Don Was receive GRAMMY awards for Album of the Year for Nick of Time – Photo courtesy CBS

Was co-founded former Detroit band Was (Not Was) with childhood friend David Was (Weiss) before going on to produce decades of commercially successful and critically-acclaimed recordings for top artists.

As President of Blue Note Records, Was oversees the label’s extensive reissue campaigns that serve audiences in both the analogue and digital realms. He joins a prestigious group of Les Paul honorees including Stevie Wonder, Sting, and Pete Townshend.

The January 23 event will be held in the Hilton Anaheim Pacific Ballroom. A reception begins at 6 PM with the ceremony following at 7 PM.

Earlier on Saturday, the NAMM TECnology Hall of Fame will induct 10 audio products and innovations released between 1928 and 2002 that have made a significant contribution to the advancement of audio technology.

The ceremony, presented by the NAMM MUSEUM of Making Music in Carlsbad and hosted by George Petersen, editor of Front of House Magazine, will be a celebration of nostalgia and innovation. A panel of more than 50 recognized audio experts, including authors, educators, engineers, facility owners and other professionals selected the nominees.

The 1966 Neumann KM84 microphone was invented by Georg Neumann five decades ago and is still in use today via the improved KM184 model. It stands out as the first microphone to use the now-standard “phantom powering system.”

Don Was - Photo by Gabi Porter

Don Was – Photo by Gabi Porter

Also entering a 50-year milestone is the Shure SM58 microphone, a standard in the eyes of many rock ‘n rollers. After three years and hundreds of tests involving dropping, throwing, cooking, salt spray immersion and submersion, the Shure SM58 was born under the watchful eye of Ernie Seeler, a classical music fan who hated rock ‘n’ roll!

Turn up Supertramp’s “Logical Song” and Steely Dan’s “Do It Again” and you’ll hear the distinct sounds produced by Wurlitzer’s 1954 Electronic Piano, originally designed as a portable and substitute for the acoustical piano. It has become a mainstay of rock, pop and jazz artists worldwide.

Roland’s RE-201 Space Echo was first released when Richard Nixon was still President, but its vintage sound continues to find its way into the recordings of musicians that include Fatboy Slim, Mr. Oizo, Sneaker Pimps, Radiohead, Lauryn Hill and more who covet its slightly unpredictable analog echo effects.

Other inductees include the 1998 Manley VoxBox and the 2002 Avid Digidesign Pro Tools HD, which are both still in production today.

The TECnology Hall of Fame ceremony will be presented Saturday, January 23, from 4-6PM in room 202A of the Anaheim Convention Center in the TEC Tracks educational area. Seating is limited and available to credentialed NAMM attendees, inductees and their guests.

NAMM 2015 Wrap-Up: Products You’ll See In Music Stores

Moog Theramini demo - photo by Donna Balancia

Moog Theramini demo – photo by Donna Balancia

By DONNA BALANCIA — Synthesizers, new apps, and guitars dominated NAMMShow 2015 as music retailers got a sneak peek of what will soon hit the stores.

Favorites included Moog’s $300 Theremini, Orange Music Education’s Musicboard, and Taylor Guitar’s latest line of guitars.

Bob Moog began building theremins in 1954 — they are considered one of the  oldest electronic instruments.  The theremin is the only instrument known that you play without touching.  Moog has come a long way since those days building theremins in the basement with his father.

The theremin is a single oscillator instrument that uses two metal rod antennas to control pitch and amplitude.

Make Noise photo by Donna Balancia

Make Noise – Photo by Donna Balancia

The left antenna — a horizontal hoop —  reduces the amplitude as the left hand is moved closer to it. Meanwhile, the right antenna — a vertical pole —  increases the pitch as the right hand is moved towards it.

Moog’s company has sold more theremins to more professionals than anyone in history.  While there are a range from which to choose, for the price and the convenient size, EastCoastRocker.com likes the Theremini.

Up-and-comer in the category is Make Noise Music, who have come up with a cool, portable synthesizer.

The Musicboard - photo by Donna Balancia

The Musicboard – photo by Donna Balancia

Another cool innovation, this one in the area of music education — is the Musicboard by Orange Music Education.

The invention enables teachers to engage students with an interactive board that plays notes and changes keys with the touch of a wand.

Music education is the key to success in music retail.  Orange Amplification, the parent company to OME, is based in the U.K.

Blackbird Guitars- story by East Coast Rocker

Blackbird Guitars – photo by Donna Balancia

Guitars of all shapes and sizes about at NAMM, but our two favorites are California’s

own Taylor Guitars and Blackbird Guitars.  Taylor’s Big Baby line is popular, and if Taylor is good enough for San Diego’s Jason Mraz, it’s good enough for us.

Our other favorite is up-and-comer in the category, Blackbird guitars, which makes its instruments from all-natural products.

For more NAMM VIDEO go to the YouTube Channel of EastCoastRocker.com’s sister site: California Rocker YouTube Channel.

END #NAMM

Slash To Receive Les Paul Award at NAMM

Slash TEC award - story by Donna Balancia

Slash – photo courtesy NAMM

ANAHEIM, Calif. — Superstar guitarist Slash will receive the Les Paul Award during the 30th Annual NAMM Technical Excellence and Creativity Awards, Saturday night, during the National Association of Music Merchants NAMM Show in Anaheim.

Comedian Sinbad will host the evening event.

The NAMM TEC Awards honors individuals and companies across 30 categories, for outstanding achievement in professional audio technology and production.

As a critically acclaimed, British-American musician and songwriter, Slash has amassed album sales topping 100 million copies, a GRAMMY Award and seven GRAMMY nominations. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2012.

Slash, who established a hot solo career in 2008, is known as former lead guitarist for Guns N’ Roses and founded the supergroup Velvet Revolver.  His current album is World On Fire.

Time magazine named Slash second, behind only Jimi Hendrix, on its “Ten Best Electric Guitar Players of All-Time” list. His famous guitar solos in songs including “November Rain” and “Sweet Child O’ Mine” are adored by rock fans worldwide.

The Les Paul Award, named for the inventor and esteemed musician, honors individuals or institutions that have set the highest standards of excellence in the creative application of audio and music technology.

Previous winners include Pete Townshend, Paul McCartney, Brian Wilson, Stevie Wonder, Neil Young and Peter Gabriel. Last year’s recipient was Todd Rundgren.

Rock Stars and Guitars: The East Coast Rocker Interview with Stevie Salas

The Stevie Salas signature Idolmaker is a lot like the artist himself, purposeful with quality, and just a little flashy.

The Stevie Salas signature Idolmaker is a lot like the artist himself, purposeful with quality, and just a little flashy.

 

The Idolmaker, Stevie Salas signature by Framus Warwick —  

By DONNA BALANCIA – Stevie Salas has worked with the best.  But despite being selected to play lead guitar for Mick Jagger, George Clinton and a host of other famous superstars, Salas is true to his humble Southern California roots.

“This is my third signature model in 25 years,” Salas told East Coast Rocker.  Salas’ extensive work as musical director for 19 Entertainment and American Idol inspired the name of the guitar.

“People have told me they think it’s the most beautifully crafted guitar and that’s not because they were talking to me and it’s my signature guitar.  It is extremely good quality. I wanted something different, something that wasn’t a ripoff of a Stratocaster or a Les Paul.”

Sleek in its purple and black with gold tone, the Idolmaker, like the rock star himself, purposeful with quality, and just a little bit flashy. The neckwood is maple, the fretboard is Tigerstripe Ebony with Indian Feather Inlay, a reminder of Salas’ Native American heritage.  It is a carved body top, the bodywood is 1-inch AAA Quilted Maple top with Mahogany body.

Particularly interesting to Salas is Warwick’s devotion to the planet: The company is known to purchase its wood from sustainable sources.

“A few years ago,  I met Hans-Peter Wilfer, who owns Warwick,” Salas said. “I like his views.  Since I have a Native American background, I wanted something that was environmentally friendly.”

Salas said he took a tour around the production facilities in Germany, met the head of production, designer Marcus Spangler and was impressed with what he saw.

“I wanted the precision of German craftsmanship but also the Native American warmth,” Salas said.

Check out Stevie’s Guitar 

CLICK HERE FOR SALAS at FRAMUS NAMMSHOW

— By DONNA BALANCIA

 

Hartley Peavey to Retailers: Get Passionate

‘Know your product, service the customer, improve the sales experience’

Hartley Peavey, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Peavey Electronic Corp. said sales expertise, customer service and product knowledge are critical to survival of the music retailer today.

How should retailers proceed going into the future? Should the music retailers lobby congress?

“If you’re waiting for the government to come to the rescue forget it,” Peavey advised.  “It’s insane to expect that you’re going to get help from on high. We’ve been spectacularly unsuccessful.”

Hartley Peavey, East Coast Rocker Donna Balancia

Hartley Peavey has an educated opinion. You can ask for it. – photos courtesy of Peavey

Peavey’s stern comments came during a panel discussion at the 2014 NAMM Show.  East Coast Rocker editor Donna Balancia was in the front row.

“I talk to dealers every day, but I want to spend a minute talking about survival for the retail music dealer.

“I went to my first NAMM show in 1954.  I like to ask questions. ‘Mr. Dealer in this value chain what is it that you do? What do you add to the formula? What is your reason for being?’ (He’ll respond) ‘I have trained people,’ which is a lie 98 percent of the time.

“They ignore retailing 101. We’re all consumers. Every day we make decisions where to spend money. When you distill it down, what (the music retailers are) telling you is they’re delivery boys.  The best damn delivery boys are the guys driving those big brown trucks if you compete with them, you will lose.

“So the answers are within you but only if you ask questions. By the way that’s the way you learn stuff, you ask questions. Every one of you retailers . What do you add to the value chain?

“I’m a big believer in education, we started our education program 30 years ago. You go in most retail music dealers they don’t know what the hell they’re selling. How are you going to sell things the customer knows more about than you?

“Your salvation is not with some congressional body, the answer to your future is within you. You’ve got to be willing to rise to the occasion. Music is one of the few things people will fight you over. If you happen to be a country music fan, and the guy sitting next to you is saying bad things about country music you want to give him a knuckle sandwich.

“You’ve got to make the experience of coming into your store a pleasant one.

“One of the things that’s wrong is we want to be everything to everybody. There is no way in hell you can know the features advantages and benefits of more than three or four products.  Are you demo-ing your products that way?

“The internet is not going to go away. It’s here and it’s going to get more pervasive.  Decide now what you’re going to do.

“Selling is not a noun. Retail is not a noun, it’s a verb. The government is not going to save your butt, they’ll kick it if you give them half a chance.

“Education on the retail music sales floor today, it’s at the lowest point ever. If we don’t do something to change that, I don’t know what’s going to happen.

“You’ve got to ask questions.  As a music industry we have done a lousy ass job of promoting ourselves. We’ve gotta ask the important questions to allow us to survive.  You better get back involved in selling with passion. We help people realize their dreams.

“A good salesman helps people realize their goals, objectives and their dreams. We’re in the dream business whether we realize it or not.

“Do things you can’t do by mail. Do installations. Do service. But here he is, in your store. He’s in your store.”

Donna Balancia is editor of East Coast Rocker and California Rocker.  Email her at editor@eastcoastrocker.com

Bob Ezrin: ‘The Future of Music Depends on the Quality of Music’

Ezrin has worked with the heavy hitters of the music world including Alice Cooper, Lou Reed and Peter Gabriel.

Ezrin has worked with the heavy hitters of the music world including Alice Cooper, Lou Reed and Peter Gabriel.

Industry must call music ‘art.’  After all, Ezrin says, ‘A rose by any other name would NOT smell as sweet’ — 

By DONNA BALANCIA – ANAHEIM – Legendary producer Bob Ezrin told music retailers Thursday that the industry must continue to build its talent pool in order to thrive.

Prior to his keynote address to kick off the 2014 National Association of Music Merchants Show in Anaheim, Ezrin told East Coast Rocker that the more time the industry wastes worrying about ancillary issues, the less time it will spend on its most critical function:  To inspire and educate.

“If we spend time worrying about things like how to get the music out, the less time we will have to make insanely good music,” Ezrin told East Coast Rocker prior to delivering his speech at the annual event that draws thousands of industry members from around the world.

His morning keynote speech drew an audience of several hundred music retailers, many of whom forged through rough winter weather to attend the conference in sunny Southern California.

Using cool-sounding words doesn’t cut it for Canadian-born Ezrin, whose experience with “cool” is vast, having worked with hundreds of top musicians since the 1970s.

“When we talk about the future of making music, we have to watch the language we use,” Ezrin said.  “Someone said to me, ‘It’s about the ‘content.‘  No it’s not. ‘Content’ is for cereal boxes, not the art. If it’s called ‘content,’ you diminish the value down to breakfast cereal…When you talk about it with mist in your eyes …Now you’re talking about music.”

Ezrin spends much of his time in philanthropy.  He is co-founder with Garth Richardson and Kevin Williams of Nimbus School of Recording Arts in Vancouver.

Ezrin implores the music industry to use terminology carefully.

Ezrin implores the music industry to use terminology carefully.

Another word Ezrin can’t stand: “Monetization.”

“I don’t want to talk about business models, or the ‘monetization’ of anything, that’s a dirty word.  Unless what we make is great, nobody’s going to pay for it. ”

How will the industry make money?

“The best thing we can be doing is insure a march to excellence, to empower, inspire, to promote people who are straining to do something unique,” Ezrin said. “And to encourage them. Music is the very special creation of very special people whose entire lives and everything they’ve ever done, seen, felt or touched goes into what they do. That process is magical.”

Ezrin said: “There is a certain amount of technique involved. So how do we become insanely great? One of the things to do, whenever you set out on a journey, you need to make a list of things Not to Do, and a list of things To Do.  One of the things to do is to make a ‘Not to do’ list.”

Ezrin warned not to “Get caught up in toys, tricks, technology, packaging, positioning or any of those things before you have something to market,” he said.

Our society is perhaps too caught up in “chasing cool,” or “the latest” in tech and that viral or other song phenomena will happen without that tech factor most of the time, he said. Using the success of the catchy “Who Let The Dogs Out,” as an example, Ezrin said, “I’m sure that person was not sitting at a computer screen or at a conference like this.”

Ezrin, a prolific producer, devotes much of his time now to music philanthropy.

Ezrin devotes much of his time now to music philanthropy. Photo courtesy of Canadian Music Hall of Fame

Ezrin said: “At the end of the day when somebody like Psy comes around, it travels around the world.” He said, the market is “extremely rational. The stuff of real value does get supported and earns something for somebody. And the stuff that’s not so good, typically doesn’t.”

He said formulas don’t count, unless you’re making a widget and what happened before won’t predict the future.

“Art is only something artists can manage,” said Ezrin. “A craftsman is someone who can create and build code .. And an artist is someone who creates something that is different.

He said: “A rose by any other name would not  smell as sweet. If you called roses ‘kumquats’ it would not be the same.”

The music, and not the “content” or the calling it of such, is the key.

“It’s not technology or modality of delivery, it is the special creation of special people that especially touches the hearts of others,” that should be the concern of the industry.

The first line of offense in inspiring youths of today to take up an instrument is to put down the smart phone, Ezrin said.

“Kids, they hear things and kids are incredibly curious, thoughtful about what they see, even with their heads down things get in,” he said. “You need to inspire and educate.  Take them to a concert.  They may be on (the smart phone) but they internalize and maybe they’ll say, ‘I want to do that.”

Music Industry Experts: Network, Network and Network Some More

East Coast Rocker photo

Industry experts tell aspiring musicians to collaborate, know the audience. BALANCIA PHOTO

ANAHEIM — If “It’s not what you know but who you know,” then aspiring songwriters and musicians are in good company, a panel of music industry experts said at NAMM over the weekend.

During a panel discussion entitled 360 Degrees of a Hit Music Track, a room of 250 songwriters and musicians were told to work the event circuit and talk up their work — to each other — and help each other make it to the top.

“Network with everyone,” attorney Neville Johnson of Johnson and Johnson LLP of Beverly Hills said. “Look around you.  The people in this room are your colleagues. Go to the events, industry meetings, groups for writers. It’s a team effort.”

Panelists included singer songwriter Barry Keenan, A and R executive Don Grierson, producer Matt Forger, publisher Robert Case, attorney Johnson and was moderated by Alex Del Zoppo of the renowned band Sweetwater.

Aspiring musicians must know their audience, take stock in their catalogues and pay close attention to the emotional communication they intend, said panelist Grierson, who has worked with many of the most notable artists in music. It all comes down to the message and the appeal of the message, Grierson said.

Musicians told to collaborate with each other, seek out music partners.

Musicians told to collaborate with each other, seek out music partners.

“I guarantee you this: They will never ask if you recorded on one track or two tracks or if it was analogue or digital,” said Grierson. “They only care about ‘Did it resonate here,” he said, pointing to his heart.

Keenan said competition may be tough, but “Never give up on your dream.”  He added that when the time is right to get your CD into the hands of a producer, make sure the product is good.

Johnson added that with continued efforts, it is possible for a new artist to break through.

“Look at Lorde, she came out of nowhere,” he said, referring to the 16-year-old New Zealand-born phenom, nominated in four categories at Sunday’s Grammy Awards. “And Adele, she’s broken all records…”

The Internet has done a lot to help aspiring and established artists get exposure. Keep networking and posting song, it was advised.

“Find a great song,” Johnson said. “I know a guy who had a one-off song that became a hit, then he bought a nice house, got a nice car, nice wife, nice life.”

Everclear’s Art Alexakis named to LA College of Music Post

Photo by Donna Balancia

Photo by Donna Balancia

By DONNA BALANCIA — ANAHEIM — Art Alexakis of Everclear has been named the chair of the songwriting department at the newly renamed Los Angeles College of Music in Pasadena.

The announcement was made during media day at the 2014 NAMM Show in Anaheim. Alexakis played his hit “Santa Monica.”

LACM representatives and Alexakis also discussed the importance of bringing music education into the schools and are working with Lennon Bus

Cort Guitars teams with Jeff Berlin on 2014 model Bass

cort berlinCort Guitars and Jeff Berlin have collaborated to release the Jeff Berlin Signature bass guitar for 2014.  The new model will debut at the NAMM Show in Anaheim, Calif., and will ship to dealers in February.

An official European launch will begin in March starting with the London Bass Guitar Show followed by various clinics around Europe and culminating at the Musikmesse Frankfurt.

Called the RITHIMIC, the bass features an alder body with a spalted maple and padouk top.  Outfitting the body are a pair of Bartolini Jeff Berlin custom soapbar pickups, a Babicz FCH4 bridge, one volume control, one balance control, one tone control, passive electronics and gold hardware.

The hard rock maple neck is complemented with a rosewood fingerboard and four inline headstock featuring Hipshot Ultralight tuners.  The action on the bass is low and it is set up with DR Strings Custom DDT (Drop Down Tuning) for easy playing.

NAMM takes place Jan. 23-26.

Read more at www.cortguitars.com 

Cool Events at annual Music Merchants’ Anaheim convention Jan. 23-26

The NAMM Show

The NAMM Show

ANAHEIM — Kick things off at the National Association of Music Merchants Convention with a Block Party, starting at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 22.  The convention runs from Jan. 23-26 in Anaheim. The night features live music from Bernie Williams and Gil Parris, plus networking, food trucks and a beer garden at the NAMM GoPro Stage on the Grand Plaza, just in front of the Anaheim Convention Center.

Some of the festivities include:

Retail Boot Camp is a full-day, idea-packed intensive marketing session that takes place the day before the show at the Anaheim Hilton, California Ballrooms A-B, second floor

  • NAMM U Breakfast Sessions discuss the industry’s current topics and how to best grow your business—with live music and a warm meal to get you going, at the Anaheim Hilton, Pacific Ballrooms, second floor
  • The NAMM U Idea Center Sessions provide tips for proven promotions, techniques and strategies from industry experts, on the show floor, Hall B, Booth 5501
  • The H.O.T. (Hands-On Training) Zone Sessions provides live educational sessions and innovative ideas for professionals in the pro audio, entertainment technologies, music business operations, recording, live sound, DJ, house of worship, commercial systems contractors/integrators, and stage and lighting industries
  • The Generation Next Sessions help music business students make the most of their NAMM Show experience and prepare for their future career
  • The Music Education Days Sessions provide inspiration and information for music education professionals

We are also looking forward to meeting with The Musicians Institute which will present news about the college’s latest educational programs, go to www.MI.edu

Go to www.namm.org for more information on the convention.